After a year's absence, Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge will be making a comeback in the 2018 London Marathon as he seeks his third victory in the event.

Kipchoge, 33, won both the 2015 and 2016 edition of the yearly marathon and will be up against Britain's Mo Farah who pulled out as planned at the halfway mark in 2013 before finishing eighth 2014.

"It's great he will be racing because I'm sure that will make the atmosphere more special," said Kipchoge.

Speaking of Farah, the Kenyan said, "It does take time to make that switch but I'm sure Mo will be successful.

"It's great he will be racing the London Marathon because I'm sure that will make the atmosphere more special."

Kipchoge, a former 5,000 metres world champion, won the 2015 race just eight seconds shy of Dennis Kimetto's world record time of 2:02:57 and although he regrets not smashing the record, he acknowledges that the situation gave him more confidence to carry on.

"I came so close to breaking the world record in 2016 and it is natural for anyone in that situation to think of what might have been.

 

"But that race gave me the confidence to go on and win the Olympic title in Rio and run so well throughout 2017," he said.

The 2018 London Marathon is set to for April.

Comment

Despite a 23km/h headwind between the 10th and 26th kilometres, Kenya’s Ruth Chepngetich shattered the Turkish all-comers’ record at the Vodafone Istanbul Marathon, winning the IAAF Gold Label road race in 2:22:36.

Comment

 American Shalane Flanagan and Kenya's Geoffrey Kamworor won women's and men's titles apiece at the 2017 New York Marathon on Sunday.

Comment

In what was a frustrating event for Kenyan athletes, Bahrain’s Abraham Cheroben won the men’s IAAF Gold Label road race in 59:11 on Sunday October 22, grabbing his third win in four years in Valencia.

The race kicked off at a steady 2:48-per-kilometre pace, powered by a group of three pacemakers and headed by Mathew Kisorio who went through the first five-kilometre check point in 14:00, just on schedule to break the 58:48 course record set by Cheroben in 2014.

Cheroben then surprisingly passed the pacemakers and took command of the race from the sixth kilometre. There were still 10 men in the leading group at the stage, but with 26 minutes on the clock, Cheroben put in another surge and was followed by the Ethiopian pair of Leul Gebrselassie Aleme and late addition Tsadik Fidaku Haftu, neither of whom had previously bettered 60 minutes for this distance.

The lead trio went through the 10-kilometre point in 27:54 with Cheroben still dictating the pace and the Ethiopians running in single file behind him. At the half-way stage, the biggest surprise was the fourth-placed runner, Norway’s Sondre Nordstad Moen. Despite moderate success at the continental level, Moen was relatively unheralded in global terms and headed into the race with a lifetime best of 1:02:19.

There were no major changes in the following kilometres as Aleme and Haftu never headed the race, leaving Cheroben with the burden of setting the pace throughout. As a result, the 15-kilometre split of 42:08 showed the speed had decreased a bit and the course record of 58:48 became an unreachable aim.

After cruising through 20 kilometres in 56:18, the decisive moment came with some 600 metres left when Cherono opened a sizeable gap on the Ethiopians to prove he was the strongest athlete today. He crossed the line in 59:11 while Aleme took the runner-up place in 59:17 to take more than a minute from his previous best. Haftu completed a classy podium in 59:21, also a massive improvement for him.

Moen obliterated his PB by more than two minutes, crossing the line in fourth place in a Norwegian record of 59:47, the second-fastest time in history by a European athlete on a record-eligible course. Multiple world and Olympic champion Mo Farah is the only European runner to have covered 13.1 miles in a faster time.

Men's results

1 Abraham Cheroben (BRN) 59:11

2 Leul Gebresilase (ETH) 59:12

3 Fikadu Haftu (ETH) 59:22

4 Sondre Nordstad Moen (NOR) 59:47

5 Mustapha El Aziz (MAR) 1:00:51

6 Amanuel Mesel (ERI) 1:00:53

7 Justus Kangogo (KEN) 1:00:53

8 Mathew Kisorio (KEN) 1:01:17

Comment

Kenya’s Joyciline Jepkosgei kept her stellar 2017 momentum alive at the Valencia Trinidad Alfonso Half Marathon, taking one second off her own world record to win the IAAF Gold Label road race in 1:04:51 on Sunday October 22.

After Saturday’s technical meeting, it became clear that a serious attack on her current world record was on the cards. A cautious Jepkosgei had commented there that she had been training well since running a world 10km record of 29:43 in Prague and was confident of running fast.

Kenya’s Ezekiel Kemboi was enlisted to pace Jepkosgei at a steady 3:05 per kilometre pace but the early splits proved to be even quicker than scheduled as the opening five kilometres were covered in a frantic 14:52, a time fast enough to finish inside 1:03. The brisk rhythm continued as the 23-year-old was timed at 30:09 at 10 kilometres, still well ahead of her own world record pace.

However, that kind of pace seemed to be self-defeating for a while as Jepkosgei’s rhythm clearly slowed down in the third five-kilometre section. Always running at Kemboi’s shoulder, the multiple world record-holder reached 15 kilometres in 45:59 which put her target in serious jeopardy; when she set the previous world record of 1:04:52 in Prague, she had clocked 45:37 at 15 kilometres.

But, to the delight of the crowd, Jepkosgei dug deep in the closing stages and by the 20-kilometre checkpoint, reached in 1:01:30, she was only five seconds in arrears of her world record goal. With a thrilling run down the final straight, Jepkosgei beat the clock and reached the finish line in 1:04:51 to set her sixth world record this year.“It was my first race in Valencia, I enjoyed a lot, the weather is nice, the circuit is perfect to run fast,” said Jepkosgei, who will turn 24 in December. “I hope to come back in March for the World Half Marathon Championships.Fancy Chemutai and Lucy Cheruiyot joined Jepkosgei on the podium to get a clean sweep of medals for Kenya. The former, still 3 years of age, ran a massive career best of 1:05:38 to improve over one minute her previous best of 1:06:58. As for Cheruiyot, she finished seven seconds outside her PB in 1:07:30.

Today’s performance was the third women’s world half marathon record set on Spanish soil in recent years after Florence’s Kiplagat previous records of 1:05:12 and 1:05:09 in Barcelona in 2014 and 2015 respectively.

Women results

1 Joyciline Jepkosgei (KEN) 1:04:51

2 Fancy Chemutai (KEN) 1:05:36

3 Lucy Cheruiyot (KEN) 1:07:30

4 Gelete Burka (ETH) 1:08:17

5 Paskalia Chepkorir (KEN) 1:09:13

6 Trihas Gebre (ESP) 1:09:55

7 Birhan Mhretu (ETH) 1:09:59

8 Azmera Gebru Hagos (ETH) 1:10:39

 

Comment

It was an enormous surprise when Kenya’s Edwin Kibet Kiptoo won the Blom Bank Beirut Marathon a year ago but his victory in this IAAF Silver Label Road Race blew his anonymity completely out of the water.

The 29-year-old will now bear the pressure of being the defending champion when he returns to the Lebanese capital on 12 November for the 15th edition of this race.

“I remember something big,” he says of his initial trip to Beirut. “I didn’t expect to win the race, so, when I think back to Beirut, I just remember a big victory in my running career.''

“It was a highlight in my running career, a day that I won’t forget in my life. I believe that when you train hard and are disciplined in all that you are doing in your daily life, you will get victories. I believe that being the boss over your own life will make you reach far.”

After a third place finish at the 2016 Brighton Marathon, a race in which he set his personal best time of 2:11:29, he turned his attention to a an autumn marathon accepting an invitation to race Beirut. But the unseasonably warm day, 25 C with no cloud cover, coupled with a difficult course meant his winning time was ‘only’ 2:13:19. 

Recent changes to the course, including the removal of a lengthy and stamina testing 14% climb along the Mediterranean coast, will certainly help this year’s field challenge the event record of 2:11:04 set by Jackson Limo in 2015. Certainly Kiptoo believes he is up to the task.

He reveals his training has been going extremely well and he can certainly point to some fine results which have boosted his confidence. He won the Luxembourg Night Marathon on 27 May and then finished second in the Hamburg Half Marathon. More recently he came close to beating his personal best half marathon time of 1:00:11.

“My training this year had been going very well. On October 1st I won the Breda half marathon in 60:42,” he declares. “I feel the body is still strong and I was fresh when I finished the race. I am now counting down the weeks and doing my last part of the training towards Beirut. I am happy to defend my title.

“My goal is to improve my time and also to retain my position of last year. Though I have pressure as defending champion, I know I can make it.”

Represented by the Dutch agency, Volare Sports, he trains in Iten, Kenya with a talented group of marathoners known as Mwisho wa Lami. The group includes Wilson Kipsang the former world record holder (2:02:23 best) and John Komen. The latter has a personal best of 2:07:13, a time that Kiptoo would certainly like to beat one day.

The Beirut Marathon now in its 15th year was founded by May El Khalil who remains Chairperson of the organisation.

El Khalil was hit by a truck while out running 20 years ago and while enduring a lengthy hospital stay she conceived the idea of having an elite world class marathon in the Lebanese capital. World marathon record holders Haile Gebrselassie (Ethiopia), Paula Radcliffe (Great Britain) as well as IAAF President Sebastian Coe have attended the marathon over the past three years, an indication that interest in the event is growing at a phenomenal rate.

If Kiptoo were to win this year he would be the first man to repeat as Beirut Marathon champion since Ethiopia’s Mohammed Temam in 2010. Clearly, the $15,000 USD first place prize money would come in handy to a man nearing the end of his career. He has reasons to invest money earned through his racing.

“I am married and blessed with one son. His name is Kiplimo,” Kiptoo explains. “We live in Iten. I like staying with my family and spend time with them. I don’t travel mostly, unless I have a mission, like going to races.”

As the Beirut Marathon fast approaches the excitement builds. There is a new and faster course for the athletes to tackle but will there be a new men’s champion or can Edwin Kiptoo repeat? It will surely take an incredible performance to deny him.

Comment

It wasn’t the race that anybody anticipated, but Eliud Kipchoge came away from the 2017 Berlin Marathon on Sunday with the win in 2:03:32 and some unanticipated late-race competition from a newcomer to the distance. 

Although the prerace hype focused on a battle between the “big three” of Kipchoge, Wilson Kipsang, and Kenenisa Bekele, by 30K the competition came down to just Kipchoge and Guye Adola, a 26-year-old Ethiopian running his first marathon. Bekele lost the lead pack just past the halfway point (he eventually dropped out) and Kipsang suddenly stopped at 30K without showing any signs of distress. 

Adola came with a personal best of 59:06 for the half marathon and now is the owner of the fastest marathon debut ever, finishing second in 2:03:46, besting Dennis Kimetto's 2:04:16 previous debut record he set in 2012.

Mosinet Geremew of Ethiopia was third in 2:06:09.

Although the goal was to beat Kimetto's world record time of 2:02:57, the leaders fell off that pace after 30K. They passed the halfway point in 1:01:29, putting them within reach, though it was not to be in the end. The weather conditions were not ideal and likely made such lofty objectives difficult, with rain, 97 percent humidity, and a starting temperature of 58 degrees.

Kipchoge, 32, is from Kenya and the 2016 Olympic marathon champion. He became a fan favorite following the Nike Breaking2 experiment, where he ran a 2:00:25 on a racetrack in Monza, Italy. Though it remains the fastest time ever for 26.2 miles, it didn’t count as an official record because of the tactics used, such as the team of rotating pacesetters who aided his attempt to break two hours.

With his race on Sunday, Kipchoge now owns three of the fastest marathons in history, not including his Breaking attempt.

In the women's race, Kenya's Gladys Cherono claimed the win in a time of 2:20:21. Ethiopia's Ruti Aga finished second in 2:20:41 with Kenya's Valary Ayabei claiming third in 2:20:53.

 

Comment

It is now confirmed that the National Olympic Committee of Kenya (NOCK) will hold its elections on Friday September 29,2017.

The date was agreed upon following a meeting on Tuesday that was chaired by current chairman Kipchoge Keino. The said elections were initially scheduled for May 5 but had to be adjourned after Kenya Taekwondo Association filed an injunction at the High Court for being omitted from participating.

20 federations will however now take part in the upcoming elections including those who had been barred such as Kenya Taekwondo Association, Kenya Cycling Federation and Kenya Badminton Association.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) had set NOCK a deadline of the end of this month for elections to be held, and had even reportedly suspended funding to the committee as a result of the delay in holding the election.

Former marathon world record holder Paul Tergat will be seeking nomination as chairman to replace 77-year-old Kipchoge Keino who has been at the helm since 1999.

 

Comment

The IAAF World Championships London 2017 just came to a wrap recently and as usual, Team Kenya did not disappoint in the bi-annual global event. 

Comment

The Kenyans and Ugandans threw everything at Mo Farah over the first nine kilometres of the 10,000m final but the reigning champion still found himself in the position where he is at his most dangerous and virtually unbeatable: at the front with 800m remaining.

While the Kenyans made it a hard race from the gun two years ago in Beijing, a different gameplan was put into fruition on the opening night of the IAAF World Championships London 2017 on Friday (4) in a bid to spoil Farah’s swansong.

Uganda’s Joshua Cheptegei and the Kenyan trio headed by his training partner Geoffrey Kamworor staked out their claim with an opening lap of 61.02 and while surging was the tactic of the day, there was still a moment of deja vu as Farah nearly fell on the last lap for the second World Championships in a row.

But the sapping variances in pace - and another stumble on the last lap - didn’t sufficiently blunt Farah’s legendary speed as the reigning champion secured his tenth successive major track title, a streak which started all the way back to the 5000m at the 2011 World Championships in Daegu, with another irresistible last lap timed at 55.63.

Farah opined beforehand that he wasn’t in his very best shape but now 34, his winning time of 26:49.51 was the second fastest of his career - second only to his European record of 26:46.57 set in Eugene six years ago - as well as the second fastest winning time in championship history . He also covered the second half in 13:13.31 as he was roared to the first half of another potential 5000/10,000m double. Of note, the fast pace in the second half brought seven runners under the 27-minute mark, making it the deepest race in championship history.

Comment

Asbel Kiprop has won four major titles at 1500m but his victory in Beijing two years ago was arguably the most impressive of the lot as he had to extricate himself from a seemingly impossible position on the last lap and overtake nine runners in the last 300 metres to ensure his third world title.

A fourth world title in London would match the haul achieved by world record-holder Hicham El Guerrouj from Morocco between 1997 and 2003. But while El Guerrouj could often rely on a teammate to ensure a fast pace to his liking, Kiprop has three younger teammates – not to mention some very capable challengers from the rest of the world – all looking to knock the reigning champion off his pedestal.

Kiprop has been in indifferent form in the lead-up to the championships. Most recently, he was a well-beaten 11th at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Monaco in 3:34.91, but experience and a cool head – which Kiprop demonstrated after getting boxed on the last lap in Beijing – are what is important in a championship setting.

Comment

 The national U18 team that recently took part in the IAAF World U18 Championships that were held at the Kasarani Stadium have each been awarded 100,000 shillings by President Uhuru Kenyatta.

Comment

8-time Diamond League Meeting Winner Hellen Obiri will lead five Kenyans in their quest for victory in women's 300 meters of the Diamond League that is set to be held on Friday July 21, 2017 in Monaco.

Comment

Asbel Kiprop and Elijah Manangoi will lead six Kenyans in the hunt for gold in the 2017 Diamond League that is set to be held on Friday July 21, 2017 in Monaco, France.

Asbel Kiprop is a 23-time Diamond League Meeting winner with his personal best coming in the same venue in July 2015 where he finished the 1500 meters in a time of 3:26:69. 

Kiprop who is the world’s most dominant miler has won four global titles, including the Olympic gold medal from 2008 when he was still a teenager. He is also the most prolific winner of the 1500m/mile Diamond Trophy, having won in 2010, 2015 and 2016.

Elijah Manangoi will be seeking to give Kiprop a run for his money when the two track giants meet on Friday night. Manangoi is the world 1500m leader, winning the IAAF Diamond League kick-off event in Doha. The world silver medalist has a 1500m best of 3:29.67 and finished third in last year’s Bowerman Mile.

Ronald Kwemoi is the other Kenyan tasked with giving competition to the two household names. Kwemoi is the Commonwealth silver medallist and has a mile best of 3:52.57. In May, the Olympic finalist destroyed a superb field over 3000m in Doha to win in 7:28.73, showing a turn of speed over the last 100 meters that will give all the other fast-finishers something to think about.

Other Kenyans that will compete in the race are Justus Soget, Timothy Cheruiyot, Jackson Mumba Kivuva and Andrew Rotich Kiptoo. 

 

Comment

Julius Yego and Emmanuel Korir will be eyeing splendid results when they participate in the Diamond League on Friday July 21, 2017 in Monaco, France.

Julius Yego will be taking part in the javelin throw and will be inspired by his season best time of 87.97 meters. The 28-year old posted a personal best time of 92.72 meters in 2015 at the World Championships to become the first Kenyan to win gold in a field event.

He will however face stiff competition from the likes of Germany's Rohler Thomas who won the 2016 edition of Diamond League that was held in Shanghai. Other stiff competitors include Jacub Vadlejch (Czech Republic), Vetter Johannes (Germany) and Walcott Keshorn (Trinidad and Tobago).

800 Meters

In the 800 meters, Emmanuel Korir will be the only Kenyan participant in a pack of eight athletes who will be eyeing victory. Korir's recent gold medal came in June at the 2017 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships in a time of 1:45:03. He will be hoping to replicate Kenya's performance in the 2016 edition of the event where Ferguson Cheruiyot led a 1,2,3 finish for Kenyans in the 800 meters race.

Korir will face stiff competition from Amel Tuka (Bahrain), Pierre-Ambroise Bosse (France) and McBride Brandon (Canada).

 

Comment

It was medals’ day for team Kenya on Sunday July 16, 2017 as Bett and Meyan scooped gold and silver in the boys’ 2000 meters amidst over 55,000 home supporters.

With only one lap remaining in the race, the two Kenyans split off the rest of the pack to create a huge gap between them and the Ethiopians who were the closest opponents.

They now had to battle for a first place finish and it is Leonard Kipkemoi Betyt who bagged gold by finishing first in a time of 5:32.52, backed by cheers from the fans who were present at the Kasarani Stadium. He was closely followed by Cleophas Kandie Meyan who posted a personal best time of 5:33.07 to finish second while Ethiopian Alemu Kitessa finished a distant third in 5:42.10.

Comment

Kenyan participants in boys’ 3000 meters steeplechase of the just concluded IAAF World U18 Championships were able to manage a second and third place finish to add silver and bronze to the hosts' medal tally.

Edward Zakayo, who was the race favourite finished just behind Ethiopian Selemon Barega in a time of 7:49.17 while Stanley Waithaka came in third in 7:50.64. Race winner Barega finished in a time of 7:47.16 which was a personal best, with the Kenyan duo also managing to record personal best times.

Comment

Kenya emerged victorious in the girls’ 800 meters of the just ended IAAF World U18 Championships, scooping both gold and silver on Sunday July 16, 2017 to add to their medal tally.

Jackline Wambui finished 1st in a time of 2:01.46 with counterpart Lydia Jeruto Lagat coming 2nd with a personal best time of 2:02.06. Ethiopia’s Hirut Meshaesha summed up the podium with a 3rd place finish in 2:06.32.

Comment

It was a race to remember for South Africa in the boys’ 200 meters of the on-going IAAF World U18 Championships after they scooped both gold and silver.

Retshidisitswe Mlenga finished first with a season best time of 21.03 with country mate Tshenolo Lemao coming in second with a person best time of 21.12.

Luis Brandner bagged silver for  Germany after finishing third in 21.23 which was also his personal best. Mlenga and Lemao also scooped gold and silver for South Africa.

Comment

Kenyan athletes Leonard Kipkemoi Bett and Cleophas Kandie are in the finals of the boys' 2000m steeplechase. This is in the ongoing IAAF World U18 Championships at the Moi International Stadium, Kasarani.

Bett qualified after emerging top in Heat 2 of the semifinals in a time of 5:46.66 ahead of Ethiopia's Girma Diriba (5:47.86) and Turkey's Anil Kalayci (5:52.64).

In Heat 1, Kandie finished 2nd in 5:51.83 behind Ethiopia's Alemu Kitessa who finished time of  5:49.79. Other athletes who have qualified for the finals include Joel Kiplangat (Uganda), Mohammed Al-Suleimani (Oman), Saba Khvichava (Georgia), Hamza Sekhmani (Morocco) and Murat Yalcinkaya (Turkey).

 

Comment

 Kenyan participants for the World Deafympics games have landed in Turkey safely ready for the tournament which is set to kick off on Tuesday July 18, 2017. The team which left Nairobi on Thursday will represent the country in several sports including 5000m and 10000m races.

The 2017 Summer Deaflympics, officially known as the 23rd Summer Deaflympics, is an international multi-sport event that will take place in Samsun, Turkey from July 18 to July 30, 2017. The sports offered will be held in 21 disciplines, including 16 individual sports and 5 team sports.

In May, a total of 30 athletes were selected by the Deaf Athletics Association of Kenya were selected to fly Kenya's flag during the tournament.

Women's Team

Hannah Wanjiru 1500, Roselida Okumu 5000m, Juster Kwamesa 5000m, Alice Atieno Discuss Women, Beryl Wamira 100m, Ruth Awuor 100m

Men's Team

John Koech 1500m, Simon Kibai 10000m, Martin Gachie 10000m, David Njeru 10000m, Daniel Kiptum 5000m, Miachel Letting 5000m, Peter Toroitich 5000m, Saulo Mwanthi 400m Hurdles, Benson Otieno 400m, Kelvin Mugo 400m, David Ogongo 400m, Boniface Kikuvi 400m, David Wamira 100m, Paul Simiyu 100m, Elisha Wekesa 100m, Walter Walenje 100m, Kelvin Waithaka 800m, Silvanus Oginga 200m, Ben Kimitei Javelin, Lucas Wanjiru 3000m, Jacob Kibet 3000m, Kokobi Omari  3000m

 

Comment

Kenya’s ambition to bag medals in the boys’ 400m in the ongoing IAAF World Championships came to a halt on Thursday afternoon when two of their representatives were eliminated in the semifinals.

Kelvin Sawe Tauta, who had qualified for the semis after posting a personal best time of 47.36 to finish 1st in Heat 3 managed a 9th place finish in the semifinals with a time of 47.55 .His compatriot David Sanayek finish one place behind him in 10th with a time of 47.66 .
Jamaica’s Anthony Cox finished first in 46.86, with Brazilian Benedito da Silva (46.87) and Antonio Watson (47.05) of Jamaica took the 2nd and 3rd positions respectively.

In the girls’ category, Mary Moraa bettered her time of 54.07 on Wednesday to finish second in a personal best time of 53.77. Her compatriot Sharon Jebet however did not qualify, finish 9th overall in 55.34 which was surprisingly her personal best.

Comment

Japhet Kibiwott Kiprotich and Noah Kiprono are in the semifinals of the boys’ 800m of the ongoing IAAF World U18 Championships after both qualified in their respective heats.

Kiprono, who was in Heat 2, finished 3rd in a time of 1:54:10. This was behind Costa Rica’s Juan Diego Castro (1:53:19) and Morocco’s Abdellah Mouzlib (1:53:22), who were first and second respectively.

In Heat 4, Toroitich beat all contestants to finish 1st in a time 1:53:94 ahead of Morocco’s Charaf Zahir (1:54:22) and Slovakia’s Jan Vukovic (1:54:38). Melese Nberet finished the 400m race in the best time, clocking 1:52:53to finish first in Heat 3.

 

 

Comment

Kenya's representatives at the IAAF World U18 Championships in the 400m girls' category Sharon Jebet and Mary Moraa are in the semifinals of the competition after qualifying in the heats.

Moraa, who was in Heat 2 finished first in a personal best time of 54.07 ahead of Brazil's Giovana Rosalia and Serbia's Katalina Sekulic.

In Heat 4, Sharon Jebet also posted a personal best time, clocking 55.91 to finish second behind Czech Republic's Barbora Malikova (55.56). Other participants who have qualified for the semis 0f the 400m include Laura Kauffman (Germany), Shaquena Foote (Jamaica), Doneisha Anderson (Bahrain) and Niddy Mingilishi (Zambia).

 

Comment

George Manangoi has qualified for the semifinals of 1500m in the boys category after finishing 1st in the Heat 2 at the Moi International Sports Centre, Kasarani. This is in the first day of the IAAF World U18 Championships that are being held in Nairobi, Kenya.

Manangoi, who is the young brother to World 1,500m silver medalist Elijah Managoi, finished the race in 3:55:00 ahead of Ethiopia's Belete Mekonen (3:56:31)and Uganda's Daniel Kiprop (3:58:68) who finished second and third respectively.

Dominic Kipkemboi also qualified for the semis, clocking 3:48:77 to qualify as number one in Heat 1 of the 1500m.

Comment

Kenya, who will be hosting this year's edition of the IAAF World U18 Championships in Nairobi will be represented by a record team of 64 junior athletes. The event is set to be held from Wednesday July 12-Sunday July 16, 2017.

On Wednesday, close to 23 Kenyan athletes will participate in 13 different events, with each of them trying to register success in their respective fields. Below is the schedule for Kenyan participants.

Morning Session

Time      Gender     Event                  Round

9:30        M             100 Metres          Decathlon Boys

09:55       M             100 Metres           Heats                  (Elijah Matayo, Kelvin Nyagodo)

10:25       M             Long Jump          Decathlon Boys     (Vincent Kilel)

10:40       W             Discus Throw      Qualification         (Harriet Chiluyi, Vivian Jeptoo)

10:50       M             1500 Metres         Heats                  (Dominic Kipkemboi, George Manangoi)

11:20      W              400 Metres          Heats                   (Sharon Jebet, Mary Moraa)

11:40       M             Shot Put (5kg)       Decathlon Boys     (Reynold Kipkorir, Joseph Nyakundi)

11:50       M             Long Jump            Qualification         (Vincent Kilel)

12:05      M              400 Metres           Heats                   (David Sanayek, Kelvin Sawe)

Afternoon Session

TIME GENDER    EVENT                               ROUND

16:55     M           High Jump                          Decathlon Boys       (Evans Kipchirchir, Micah Kipkirui)

 17:00     M          100 Metres                         Semi-Final                 (Elijah Matayo, Kelvin Nyagodo)

17:25      M          Triple Jump                        Qualification               (Vincent Kilel, Musyoka Mwema)

17:30      M          Hammer Throw (5kg)          Qualification Group A   (Victor Kiplimo)

17:40      M          800 Metres                         Heats                         (Japheth Kibiwott, Noah Kiprono)

18:15      W          Shot Put (3kg)                    Final                          (Peninah Akoth, Sharon Mukite)

18:25      M          400 Metres                         Decathlon Boys            (David Sanayek, Kelvin Sawe)

18:35      M          Hammer Throw (5kg)         Qualification Group B     

18:45      W         100 Metres                         Heats                          (Elijah Matayo, Kelvin Nyagodo)

19:20      M          100 Metres                         Final                            (Elijah Matayo, Kelvin Nyagodo)

19:40      W         3000 Metres                       Final                       (Beatrice Chebet, Emmaculate Chepkirui)

 

 

Comment

Asbel Kiprop finished third as Botswana's Nijel Moses won the 800m in London  Diamond league on Sunday.

Amos adopted Rudisha-like tactics as he followed pacemaker Bram Som through half way in 49.58 and held off the field into the home straight.

From there, it was all about Amos and his head-back, chest-out style, which saw him home in 1:43.18, his quickest time since 2015.

Behind him, there was a flurry of fast-finishers as US champion Donavan Brazier went sub-1:44 for the first time this year with 1:43.95.

That was enough to hold off Kenya’s triple world 1500m champion Asbel Kiprop.

Comment

Hellen Obiri  set a new meet and Kenyan record in London on Sunday.

Hellen Obiri upset the home favourite to win in a MR and a new Kenyan record 4:16.56.

In  the women’s mile, Hellen Obiri upstaged Laura Muir’s attempt to break the British record by out-battling the Scot on home straight to break her own national best and set a meeting record of 4:16.56.

Only Genzebe Dibaba has run faster than that time this millennium while Obiri moves above Mary Slaney on the world all-time list having eclipsed Faith Kipyegon as the fastest Kenyan ever.

Jenny Meadows took the field through the first two laps a full one second ahead of schedule in 2:07.27 before Muir was left alone with Obiri on her tail. They went through the bell in 3:12.28 before a battle royal ensued between the pair over the final circuit.

As the Kenyan pulled clear to triumph, Muir was left to rue the speedy early pace as she slipped out of contention to clock 4:18.03, missing Zola Budd’s British best by just six tenths.

Winny Chebet was third while there was a Polish record of 4:19.55 for Angelika Cichoka in fourth. With the top five athletes finishing within 4:20 and best marks-for-place being set from fourth to 14th, it was the deepest women’s mile race in history.

Comment

The Nairobi 2017 IAAF World Under 18 Championships have started gaining momentum after Poland became the first European country to arrive ahead of the tournament which is expected to kick off on July 12th. The championships will take place until Sunday July 16, 2017.

Poland's contingent who landed on Tuesday is comprised twenty one athletes and ten officials.  This will be the first global track and field championships to be held in Kenya. It will also be the final edition of the World U18 Championships as the IAAF’s focus will shift towards driving regional and continental competitions.

United States, Britain, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Switzerland and Australia pulled out of the competition citing security concerns but Interior Cabinet Secretary Joseph Nkaiserry assured all participating teas that all will be well during their stay in Kenya. ``All our security apparatus and intelligence are in place in readiness for the competition.'' 

 

Comment

IAAF CEO Olivier Gers, LOC Chair Jackson Tuwei and CEO Michael Mwangi Muthee visited the competition and training venues for next month’s IAAF World U18 Championships at the Moi International Sports Centre and was shown around Kenyatta University where the athletes will be accommodated.

Work is now well under way and the Local Organizing Committee is confident the tracks will be ready in time for the championships which begin on 12-16 July. The comittee is also working to implement the necessary security measures to deliver a safe and secure environment for the athletes.

Gers praised the committee for a job well done.

 “A huge amount of work has gone into the preparation of these championships and I want to thank the organising committee and everyone in Nairobi and across Kenya for the work they have put in,” he said. “The athletes will love competing in this beautiful stadium and I hope the fans will give them the loudest of cheers.

“We have the final push in the weeks ahead, finishing off, tidying up and making sure all the final elements are in place. It's like a house; it almost takes longer to put the finishing touches on the house and to make everything right than to actually build it.”

CEO Mwangi Mathee confirmed that the LOC is now approaching the final stages of the preparations.

“It has been like a fairy tale; we have seen it all,” he said. “But the most wonderful thing is that we are now heading to the final phase and that we can see the fruits of our labour and I am very proud of the team.

“I’d like the IAAF and the government of Kenya to make sure that the work and the legacy of the investment hasn’t been done in vain. We should look beyond 2017 and make Nairobi a sports centre.”

This will be the first global track and field championships to be held in Kenya. It will also be the final edition of the World U18 Championships as the IAAF’s focus will shift towards driving regional and continental competitions.

“What we want first to be remembered is the quality of competition,” said Gers. “We want to make sure we leave behind a lasting legacy for athletics, for the country of Kenya and for the whole region. To have a vibrant, modern equipped stadium that can be reused in future championships is quite critical.”

 

Comment

Defending champion Mary Keitany will return to the 2017 TCS New York City Marathon on Sunday, 5 November to go for a fourth consecutive victory at this IAAF Gold Label Road Race, organisers have announced.

Keitany, 35, of Kenya, is a two-time winner of the Abbott World Marathon Majors, taking the series titles in 2012 and 2016. This year, she has already won her third career Virgin Money London Marathon in April, breaking the women’s only marathon record in a blistering time of 2:17:01.

Keitany has won the TCS New York City Marathon each of the last three years, including a dominating performance last year in which she surged ahead at the 14th mile to finish the course on a solo run in 2:24:26. Her 3:34 margin of victory was the greatest in the women’s race since 1980, and she became the first able-bodied runner since Grete Waitz to win the event three years in a row.

“Another top finish for Mary would give her the second most titles in the event after Grete Waitz," said Peter Ciaccia, president of events for New York Road Runners and race director of the TCS New York City Marathon.

“I’m so excited to return to New York to race for my fourth consecutive title,” Keitany said. “Being among the all-time leaders in New York City is truly an honour, and while it will not be easy to defend my title, surpassing a legendary runner like Paula Radcliffe for the second-most victories by a woman in the event would be incredible.”

Comment

Kenya has officially withdrawn from the sixth edition of the Commonwealth Youth Games that are set to be held in Bahamas from 19-23rd July 2017.

The competitions will attract more than 1300 youth athletes aged between 14-18 years from the 70 Commonwealth Nations and Territories. Among the games for participation are athletics, rugby 7s, swimming, cycling, boxing and judo.

In a letter from the Ministry of Sports, Culture and Arts, the Olympics Committee said that the withdrawal is due to limited resources, since the country has committed most of it to the world under 18 Youth Championships which it is set to host.

``After due considerations and deliberations, I have been advised to inform you that we will not be in a position to sponsor the team because most of our resources have been committed to the World Under 18 Youth Championships which Kenya is hosting. Consequently, we will not send a team to the games. Please inform the organizers accordingly,'' part of the statement read.

 

Comment

Kipchoge Keino Celebrates his 77th birthday today (8 June 2017) and while he might have suffered a setback in his leadership and administrative duties at the National Olympic Committee of Kenya, He remains one of, if not the best, athletes in history. 

We take a moment today to remember President Jomo Kenyatta's message to Kipchoge Keino in 1965. The message, sent to Keino as a telegram, read;

"Many congratulations on breaking world record for 3000.By this great achievement you have put Kenya on the map of world sport. Government of Kenya is very proud of your record."

Kipchoge Keino had just knocked six and a half seconds  off a one week old record for 3000M in Halsingborg Sweden. He ran in 7 minutes 39.5 seconds. 

READ: Kipchoge 'Kip' Keino

 

 

Comment

The 2017 Safaricom Athletics Kenya National Track and Field contests will take place from Thursday this week at Nyayo National Stadium with all the 16 affiliated branches fielding their finest.

The national championships come after all the federations regions concluded their selections last weekend with new upstarts propelling themselves to competitive running.
Renewed rivalry will pity athletes from the disciplined institutions as the tussle for retention of coveted trophies play out during the three-day championships sponsored by telephone service provider Safaricom and Athletics Kenya.

As it have been characteristics with the annual challenge, new champions will emerge from the production line and big names will be missing in action after transiting to the road races running after dominating local and abroad scenes.

The national championships will be another chance for coaches to test their new talents after brilliant performance during national and regional championships. We have young and energetic sprinters taking over, said a senior sprint coach from Kenya Police Service.

A blistering battle awaits the two main rivals the Kenya Defense Forces and the Kenya Police Service as each side go for every single point to amass the maximum to defend trophies decorating their selves as the regions charm each other for superiority.

The Kenya Prison Service will be boasted by the new signees with Margaret Wambui, Alice Aprot, and Wilfred Kimitei mounting formidable onslaught.

Newly discovered Ferdinand Omanyala, Dennis Otieno, Maximila Imali and Damaris Akoth will dominate the sprints while Nicholas Kiplagat, Lydia Cheruto and Gloria Kite will send shock waves in the middle distant events.

In the field, Dominic Abunda, Rose Rakamba and Boaz Monyancha will have to up their hammer and shot put throwing skills in order to attain qualifying distant for the World championships this year.

Athletics Kenya Acting Chief Executive Officer Susan Kamau said all the 16 AK branches with take part during the three days competitions that will see most of the finals held during the last day on Saturday.

Only those who have attained the International Association of Athletics Federations World Championships standards will be invited for the trials for the August global event after the national.

Athletics Kenya
Media & Communications

Comment

Taking the lead just past the three-kilometre mark, Ethiopia’s Netsanet Gudeta ran away from a strong women’s field at the Ottawa 10k, winning the IAAF Gold Label road race in 31:35 on Saturday (27).

Among the vanquished was heavily favoured Kenyan Paskalia Chepkorir who struggled home second in 32:08 with Monica Ngige, also of Kenya, taking third place in 32:46.

Given the warm conditions – it was 23C at the 6:30pm start – it was a bold display of front running by the 26-year-old Ethiopian but she had an additional incentive to run hard from the front as the race offers a $4000 bonus to the first runner, man or woman, to cross the finish line.

The elite women were given a head start of three minutes and 10 seconds over the men’s field. Gudeta’s compatriot Leul Gebresilase gave chase but fell a mere eight seconds short of catching her as he won the men’s race in 28:43. They hugged at the finish and were wrapped in an Ethiopian flag by supporters.

“I am extremely happy for winning the race,” said Gudeta. “I was confident from the beginning and I had the feeling that I was going to be ahead of the men.”

Several times over the final few kilometres she checked her wrist watch – she passed 5km in 15:50 – and turned around to see who was in pursuit. Clearly she had destroyed the Kenyan challenge early on but it wasn’t the women she was concerned about.

“It helped that I had to run very fast so I could compete with the men, to be ahead of them,” she said.

“I had to keep checking who was behind me, how I was doing. That was all I was doing. I was more concerned about the men. Once I left the (Kenyan) ladies, I didn't have much concern about them. My concern was with the men.”

Victory in the women’s race earned her $8000 in addition to the gender bonus. Chepkorir, who has a best 10km time of 30:57, just two seconds slower than the Ottawa course record (30:55 by Gladys Cherono in 2015), collects $4000 for finishing in the runner-up position while Ngige will earn $3000.

“When I was starting the race I thought I would win,” said Chepkorir. “I got to around 5km and I had a problem in my throat, so I reduced the pace. I have allergies. When I came here I got the allergies. I was sneezing.

“I was not looking back I listened to the men coming from behind. And I heard Monica. I knew I would be number two. I am very happy.”

The men’s race had suffered with the last-minute withdrawals of 2012 winner Geoffrey Mutai due to injury and defending champion Mohammed Ziana because of passport problems. Last year’s runner-up, Yitayal Atnafu of Ethiopia, also cancelled with an injury.

But once the gun was fired, the remainder of the elite entrants got down to business and the absence of the pre-race favourites was largely forgotten.

It was Nicholas Bor, the 2015 Ottawa champion, who charged out to an early lead in the men’s race. For the past two years he has battled injuries and treated Ottawa as a comeback race. Within three kilometres, the pack had whittled down to three. The 24-year-old Gebresilase, who has a personal best of 28:12, followed closely alongside USA’s Marty Hehir of the Northern Arizona Elite Club. The trio passed half way in 14:29, but when the Ethiopian surged at 8 kilometres it was a decisive move.

“I was looking straight ahead to Netsanet; in the last kilometres she was very strong,” Gebresilase said. “But I am very happy that Ethiopians won both the competitions today. This race is very good, very well organised.”

Hehir was delighted with his performance, crossing the finish line second in 29:05. A graduate of Syracuse University, he has been training in Flagstaff, Arizona, since graduation two years ago and earlier this spring he recorded a 10,000m PB of 28:08.60. Bor, meanwhile, finished in 29:33, a victim of both the Ethiopian’s dramatic surge and the heat.

“I was definitely aiming for at least the top five so I know I was able to be up there,” said Hehir. “Training has been going well. This was essentially the race I was peaking for and I wanted to give it a shot and I did so.

“The reason Bor dropped is because the guy who won put in a huge surge so I was barely hanging on as well. I wasn't thinking too much except for the pain of it all. But I was pretty happy when I saw that Bor broke hard.”

Although he had felt faint at one point in the race, around the time Gebresilase surged, Bor was pleased with his performance. He collects $3000 for third place.

Comment

Leading from start to finish, Peres Jepchirchir proved the strongest in a race heavily impacted by harsh weather conditions to win the Ottawa 10K, an IAAF Gold Label Road Race, on Saturday (28).

The 22-year-old Kenyan, who surprised many with her victory at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships two months ago, clearly suffered from the 22C temperatures and staggered around the finish area for several anxious seconds before crossing the line in 31:29. She collapsed and was transported in a wheelchair to the medical tent immediately to recover.

Organisers had wisely pushed back the start time by half an hour to 7:00 p.m. to try and beat the unseasonably hot weather but even this measure was not enough. No sooner had the race begun than a surprise rain shower greeted the runners adding to their woes.

Jepchirchir had passed 5k in 15:36 with a four second cushion over Mamitu Daska of Ethiopia and simply extended her lead to the finish with the Ethiopian finishing second in 32:08. Rebecca Chesir of Kenya was third in 32:40.

Ottawa employs a unique ‘gender gap’ by which the elite women are given a head start of 3 minutes 15 seconds over the men. The first man or woman to cross the finish line earns an additional USD $2000. Through the latter stages of the race Jepchirchir did everything to protect that lead. 

“At 5k when I saw that I was alone I knew that I would win the race,” said the winner with a smile. “I knew about the time difference. I knew they (the men) were coming but I didn’t see behind, just in front.”

“My plan was to push the time because I knew it was hot so I thought if I would run fast in the first half I could run a better time. Then I felt a pain in my stomach (at the finish) and I was feeling pain.”

Although she didn’t exhibit the same degree of exhaustion as her rival, Daska was nevertheless affected by the conditions. Last November she won the Great Ethiopian Run, one of the biggest races in Africa, joining some of her nation’s greatest athletes in the list of victors. Today she lamented a lost opportunity.

“The conditions were very difficult. It was very humid and at the same time it was raining,” she said echoing the winner’s sentiments. “Combined it was the worst situation and it tired me out so I couldn’t perform.”

“I was trying to keep pace with them (Kenyans) and watching how their breathing is but I couldn’t keep up (with Jepchirchir) because of the humidity, that’s why I dropped back to third place for a bit. I tried to keep up. Because this is my first time in Canada to compete I am happy with the result I got and I hope to perform better next time.” 

Morocco’s Mohammed Ziani was the surprise winner of the men’s race in a time of 28:37 just holding off Yitayal Atnafu Zerihun of Ethiopia who recorded the same time. Third place went to Ahmed Tamri, also of Morocco, in 28:40.

The trio had broken away from a group at 8k –one which included the favoured Simon Cheprot of Kenya – and watched each other continually for signs of weakness. They all took water at the same stations marking their time together as they came down the final straight. Ziani had just enough to claim victory. He knelt on the ground and kissed it moments afterwards. 

“In the first six kilometres I was not thinking I was going to win but in the last 2k I said, ‘this is my race today I am not going to give up,’ Ziani said.

“I didn’t talk to any other Moroccans about the race, I was focusing on the race to win. I am very happy that I won today.”

A member of the Royal Moroccan Guard, Ziani trains with the national team in the high altitude training camp at Ifrane and was only released to travel on Friday, a day later than scheduled. In preparation for the Ottawa race he won the Rabat International Half Marathon in 1:01:21.Organisers had wisely pushed back the start time by half an hour to 7:00 p.m. to try and beat the unseasonably hot weather but even this measure was not enough. No sooner had the race begun than a surprise rain shower greeted the runners adding to their woes.

Jepchirchir had passed 5k in 15:36 with a four second cushion over Mamitu Daska of Ethiopia and simply extended her lead to the finish with the Ethiopian finishing second in 32:08. Rebecca Chesir of Kenya was third in 32:40.

Ottawa employs a unique ‘gender gap’ by which the elite women are given a head start of 3 minutes 15 seconds over the men. The first man or woman to cross the finish line earns an additional USD $2000. Through the latter stages of the race Jepchirchir did everything to protect that lead. 

“At 5k when I saw that I was alone I knew that I would win the race,” said the winner with a smile. “I knew about the time difference. I knew they (the men) were coming but I didn’t see behind, just in front.”

“My plan was to push the time because I knew it was hot so I thought if I would run fast in the first half I could run a better time. Then I felt a pain in my stomach (at the finish) and I was feeling pain.”

Although she didn’t exhibit the same degree of exhaustion as her rival, Daska was nevertheless affected by the conditions. Last November she won the Great Ethiopian Run, one of the biggest races in Africa, joining some of her nation’s greatest athletes in the list of victors. Today she lamented a lost opportunity.

“The conditions were very difficult. It was very humid and at the same time it was raining,” she said echoing the winner’s sentiments. “Combined it was the worst situation and it tired me out so I couldn’t perform.”

“I was trying to keep pace with them (Kenyans) and watching how their breathing is but I couldn’t keep up (with Jepchirchir) because of the humidity, that’s why I dropped back to third place for a bit. I tried to keep up. Because this is my first time in Canada to compete I am happy with the result I got and I hope to perform better next time.”  

Morocco’s Mohammed Ziani was the surprise winner of the men’s race in a time of 28:37 just holding off Yitayal Atnafu Zerihun of Ethiopia who recorded the same time. Third place went to Ahmed Tamri, also of Morocco, in 28:40.

The trio had broken away from a group at 8k –one which included the favoured Simon Cheprot of Kenya – and watched each other continually for signs of weakness. They all took water at the same stations marking their time together as they came down the final straight. Ziani had just enough to claim victory. He knelt on the ground and kissed it moments afterwards. 

“In the first six kilometres I was not thinking I was going to win but in the last 2k I said, ‘this is my race today I am not going to give up,’ Ziani said.

“I didn’t talk to any other Moroccans about the race, I was focusing on the race to win. I am very happy that I won today.”

A member of the Royal Moroccan Guard, Ziani trains with the national team in the high altitude training camp at Ifrane and was only released to travel on Friday, a day later than scheduled. In preparation for the Ottawa race he won the Rabat International Half Marathon in 1:01:21.

Comment

Lilian Kasait came second behind  Ethiopia's Genzebe Dibaba in Eugene on Friday during a non league Diamond league event.

The women’s 5000m, which was not a Diamond League discipline, produced a commanding display by Ethiopia’s Genzebe Dibaba, who won in 14:25.22 from Kenya’s Lilian Kasait Rengeruk (14:36.80) and Sifan Hassan (14:41.24).

Dibaba had been on the hunt for the world record of 14:11.15, held by her sister Tirunesh, but after passing 3000m in 8:39.21, the wheels slowly began to fall off. Nonetheless, she fought to the finish to clock the second fastest time in the world this year.

In the women’s national 800m, Charlene Lipsey took command of the race early in the second lap and ran the legs off her competitors, powering home to victory in 1:59.87 from Chrishuna Williams (2:00.62) and 17-year-old Samantha Watson, who was third in 2:01.47. Gabriele Stafford took the women’s national 1500m in 4:07.79.

Comment

A strong Kenyan contingent is expected to dominate proceedings once again at the Edinburgh Marathon on Sunday (28) as the event, an IAAF Bronze Label road race, reaches its 15th year.

With several thousand competitors expected to descend on Scotland’s capital city for the full 26-mile race and the adjoining half marathon, Eddah Jepkosgei is returning to defend the title she won last year.

With the event starting in Edinburgh’s city centre and then looping out to the coast, the expected warm conditions could point to a repeat triumph for Jepkosgei who 12 months ago took victory in 2:39:53, six minutes outside the course record set in 2005.

But 2005 World Championships representative Hayley Haining, who scored second place in 2016, is also back with the university lecturer still very much competitive at the age of 45.

The women’s elite field additionally includes London 2012 Olympian Olga Dubovskaya, who is returning from the birth of her first child last year, and 2015 Brighton Marathon victor Pennina Wanjiru Ndungu.

The main marathon, still regarded as the second-largest in the UK to London, has become part of an overall two-day running festival which is now incorporating junior races on top.

Mark Woods for the IAAF

Comment

Eugene classic witnessed as an 18-year-old came back from near-disaster at the penultimate water jump to win in 8:58.78, the second fastest run of all time and a world U20 record and the announcing of a new star.

On the first evening of action at the IAAF Diamond League in Eugene, many had expected the women’s 3000m steeplechase to prove another demonstration by world record holder Ruth Jebet, but a new star emerged in the form of Kenya’s Celliphine Chespol.

In the non-Diamond League event, Chespol moved to the front with 600m remaining and appeared poised for victory, but gasps went through the crowd as she stopped suddenly after emerging from the water to fix a loose shoe. The move cost her the best part of 20 metres, with both Jebet and Kenyan compatriot Beatrice Chepkoech taking an immediate advantage.

However, Chespol recovered it steadily over the following 300 metres, then powered away up the home straight to win in convincing style, taking seven seconds off her world U20 record of 9:05.70.

Chepkoech came through strongly for second in 9:00.70, with Jebet third in 9:03.52.

Comment

Both course records fell at the Mattoni Karlovy Vary Half Marathon as Kenyan duo Wilfred Kimitei and Yvonne Jelagat triumphed at the IAAF Gold Label Race on Saturday (20).

A group of eight men passed through 10km in 28:59. Kenya’s Peter Lemuya and Morocco’s Moussab Hadout fell back from the pack before the leaders passed through 15 kilometres in 43:22, paced by Timothy Kimeli.

But Kimeli decided to stay in the race and ran alongside Kimitei, Edwin Kiplagat and Evans Cheruiyot for the final few kilometres. Kimitei proved to have the stronger finish and stormed home to win in 1:00:54 as just five seconds separated the first four men to cross the finish.

Kimitei’s winning time took seven seconds off the race record with compatriots Edwin Kimutai Kiplagat and Timothy Kimeli following closely behind, sharing a time of 1:00:57.

“The race wasn’t at all easy,” said Kimitei, the African 10,000m silver medallist. “The hills were pretty tough but I kept enough strength for the finish.”

Just two athletes remained in contention before the half-way point of the women’s race as Sutume Asefa and Yvonne Jelagat reached 10km in 32:04, more than 20 seconds ahead of their nearest pursuers.

Asefa then gradually pulled away from Jelagat and the Ethiopian looked as though she was on her way to victory. But Jelagat found another gear in the final kilometre and reeled in Asefa, winning in 1:08:19 to take 48 seconds off the race record.

Asefa was second in 1:08:40, also finishing well inside the previous race record, while Kenya’s Marion Limo took third in 1:11:21.

“I’m pleased that I pulled it off and made my coach happy,” said Jelagat, whose previous best of 1:09:04 was set on her debut at the distance in Prague last month. “I had quite a lot of energy left at the end which meant I was able to speed up. When I saw Sutume was struggling, I seized the opportunity and it paid off.”

Jelagat broke the race record of Joyciline Jepkosgei who debuted here in 2016 with 1:09:07. Jepkosgei is now the world record-holder with her 1:04:52 run in Prague last month.

Although the Mattoni Karlovy Vary Half Marathon course is pretty rugged, the ‘city of colonnades’ offers plenty of opportunities to run fast. “Today we got to see just how fast Karlovy Vary can be,” said RunCzech Running League President Carlo Capalbo. “I’m delighted that the men and women have met our expectations and ran so competitively and fast.”

LEADING RESULTS

Men

1 Wilfred Kimitei (KEN) 1:00:54

2 Edwin Kimutai Kiplagat (KEN) 1:00:57

3 Timothy Kimeli (KEN) 1:00:57

4 Evans Cheruiyot (KEN) 1:00:59

5 Shadrack Korir Kimining (KEN) 1:01:37

6 Donald Mitei (KEN) 1:02:11

7 Moussab Hadout (MAR) 1:02:20

Women

1 Yvonne Jelagat (KEN) 1:08:19

2 Sutume Asefa (ETH) 1:08:40

3 Marion Jepkirui Limo (KEN) 1:11:21

4 Ayantu Gemechu (ETH) 1:11:49

5 Mercy Jerotich Kibarus (KEN) 1:13:44

6 Polline Wanjiku Njeru (KEN) 1:13:51

7 Olga Kotovska (UKR) 1:14:18

Comment

Alex Korio and Irene Cheptai made it a Kenyan double at the TCS World 10K Bengaluru 2017 race, winning at the 10th edition of this IAAF Bronze Label Road Race in 28:12 and 31:51 respectively, on Sunday.

Cheptai caught the eye in particular with an impressive performance that will confirm her rising status in the world of distance running and reinforce the belief that she can be among the medallists over the same distance on the track at the IAAF World Championships London 2017 this coming August.

She continued her unbeaten year, which includes a win at the World Cross Country Championships in March, with the second fastest time ever seen in the Bengaluru women’s race.

A conservative first half saw nine women pass three kilometres in 9:51 and five runners – Cheptai and her Kenyan compatriots Gladys Chesir, Helah Kiprop and Magdalyne Masai as well as Ethiopia’s Worknesh Degefa – were still together as the halfway point was reached in 16:19, at this stage well outside course-record pace.

However, Cheptai was looking comfortable and always to the fore during the first five kilometres and soon took matters into her own hands.

She gradually went through the gears in the seventh and eighth kilometres as her rivals one-by-one slipped away as they struggled to stay with the race favourite.

Despite being on her own at the front, her tempo didn’t drop over the final two kilometres and she crossed the line in the Sree Kanteerava Stadium just three seconds outside the course record of 31:48, set by another Kenyan runner Lucy Kabuu in 2014, after running the second half of the course in 15:32.

“I wasn’t confident at the start,” said Cheptai, partially explaining why she had not pushed the pace harder during the opening kilometres. “But from eight kilometres I grew in confidence and knew that I was going to win, and I was trying for the course record from seven kilometres.”

Degefa, the last of Cheptai’s opponents to succumb, hung on to take second place in 32:00 while the 2012 women’s winner Kiprop closed the gap on Degefa in the closing stages of the race but was third on this occasion in 32:02.

Korio, another former champion of the TCS World 10K, regained the title he won in 2013 with a strong second half of the race which also saw the winner run a negative split.

New Zealand’s Zane Robertson pushed the pace along with designated pacemaker Stephen Kissa, from Uganda, during the early part of the race as a nine-man pack went through three kilometres in 8:30 and then the midway point in 14:09.

However, a sharp increase in pace from the halfway point, initially instigated by Kenya’s Edwin Kiptoo and then Korio, saw the leading pack quickly disintegrate.

Korio then threw down the gauntlet midway through the seventh kilometre and no one could stay with him.

Even though pain seemed to be etched across his face for the final third of the race, Korio didn’t falter and the gap between himself and his nearest challengers – Kiptoo and Kissa having a duel for the other places on the podium – kept on gently growing.

Korio won in 28:12 with Kiptoo winning the battle for second in 28:26 with Kissa – who later said he’d decided to finish the race around the halfway point – taking third on his debut over the distance in 28:28.

“My experience after winning the race in 2013 certainly helped me today. I knew the course and I knew where would be a good place to push,” reflected Korio. 

“I realised I could win the race at around six kilometres. I was watching Zane until the 6km mark and when Zane dropped, I knew I could push it even more,” he added.

Robertson, highly favoured after his outstanding 2016 which saw him lead the world over 10km on the roads with his 27:28, struggled during the second half of the race and finished down in seventh in 28:49.

Kenya’s world record holder Leonard Komon and Ethiopia’s defending champion Mosinet Geremew were off the back of the leading group by the fifth kilometre and eventually finished eighth and 10th in 28:55 and 29:31 respectively.

An estimated 24,000 runners took to the roads of Bengaluru on Sunday for the five different races in Asia’s leading run over distance. Korio and Cheptai each took home a winner’s cheque for US$ 26,000.

Comment

Fancy Chemutai enhanced her reputation as one of the rising stars of the road racing circuit with a course record on a warm and blustery day in the Gothenburg Half Marathon on Saturday (20) in 1:07:58.

Chemutai has only raced twice internationally but the 22-year-old excelled in both races. She finished third at the Prague Half Marathon on 1 April, clocking 1:06:58 on her debut at the distance before claiming her first overseas win in Gothenburg ahead of one of the in-form athletes on the roads this year.

After a steady opening 5km split of 15:51, defending champion and course record-holder Violah Jepchumba asserted the pressure on Chemutai with a 15:32 split through 10km in 31:23. Chemutai lost contact for the first time in the eighth kilometre but fought back to level terms with her fellow Kenyan, who finished one place ahead of Chemutai at the Prague Half Marathon last month in 1:05:22.

Rocking from side to side, Jepchumba was visibly working hard and her front-running efforts seemed to be reaping their reward. She eked out another small gap just before the 15km checkpoint in 47:48 but Chemutai countered it again on the gradual incline over the Gota Alv Bridge, one of two bridges on the course.

Despite slowing markedly after an aggressive start, the course record – and the event’s first ever sub-68-minute winning time – were still in touch as they raced back through the city centre and out towards the finish-line in the Slottsskogen Stadium.

Chemutai opened up a small gap on Jepchumba through the 20km checkpoint in 1:04:31 which she duly extended on the series of small undulations in the last two kilometres to ensure her first ever international win. Chemutai broke the tape in 1:07:58 to eclipse the course record by three seconds and take the scalp of Jepchumba, who had to settle for second in 1:08:10.

Margaret Agai made it a Kenyan clean sweep in 1:09:43 with Beatrice Mutai, the older sister of Olympic 1500m champion Faith Kipyegon, fourth in 1:10:14.

Geoffrey Yegon provided the first half of the Kenyan double in Gothenburg with victory in 1:00:19.

Three athletes were still in contention heading into the last kilometre but the runner-up from last year went one better this time, defeating Seoul Marathon winner Amos Kipruto (1:00:24) and Leonard Langat (1:00:33) while 2013 world cross-country champion Japheth Korir finished fifth in 1:01:39.

Defending champion and course record-holder Richard Mengich dropped out before the 15km checkpoint.

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